Francoise Pascal

Also known as: -


Francoise Pascal pornstar profile picture
Birthday
Oct 14, 1949
Birth Place
Vacoas, Mauritius
Dead or Alive?
-
Ethnicity:
Caucasian
Nationality:
French
Occupation
Pornstar
Career Start
-
Career End
-
Body Type:
-
Measurements:
37-24-36 in
Cup Size:
36D (80D)
Boobs Type:
Natural
Height:
165cm (5ft 4in)
Weight:
-
Eye Color:
Brown
Hair Color:
Brown

ABOUT Francoise Pascal

MODEL INFORMATION

Francoise Pascal is a well known French pornstar of caucasian ethnicity. She was born on October 14, 1949, in France. She is famous for her big natural tits, with a cup-size of 36D (80D). Her body measurements are 37-24-36 in and she is 165 cm (5 ft 5 in) tall. Francoise Pascal has brown eyes and can be seen in most of her appearances with black hair.

MORE INFORMATION

Interesting things about Francoise Pascal

Francoise Pascal is a renowned model and actress. She is born to Israeli-Mauritian parents on October 14, 1949, in France. She’s known for her appearance in Mind Your Language, a British sitcom that aired from 1977 to 1979.

In May 1970, she was the centerfold model for Penthouse magazine where she posed nude. In the same year during August, she had a cameo role in a French film. Before her rise to stardom, she started in London as a dancer for Top of the Pops. Before making a name, she appeared in two minor films in 1968. But her break happened when she played Paola in There's a Girl in My Soup (1970), starring Peter Sellers. In 1971, she played Marie in Burke & Hare, and in 1974, appeared in another film by Sellers, Soft Beds, Hard Battles. In 1971, she had a role in Coronation Street by playing Ray Langton’s friend.

In 1972, La Rose de Fer’s producer offered Pascal to star in the film albeit not the first choice of Jean Rollin. She played two roles in BBC’s Play of the Month anthology strand with Lee Remick on Summer & Smoke by Tennessee Williams and The Adventures of Don Quixote with Rex Harrison in 1973. She moved to France and starred in the 1974 film, Si tu n'en veux pas ("French Undressing"). By 1976, she moved back to England to star in Keep It Up Downstairs together with Diana Dors, William Russell, and Jack Wild. After a while, in 1978, she appeared in Rollin's Les Raisins de la Mort.

She appeared as a guest artist in the 1975 show, My Honourable Mrs with Derek Nimmo, Happy Ever After with Terry Scott in 1976, and Terry Wogan’s game show, Blankety Blank, which all happens to be produced by BBC. She guested on You're On Your Own, starring Denis Quilley.

She met Vince Powell, a comedy writer, at Thames Television all while starring in one of his shows, Rule Britannia!. She found out that Danielle Favre was writing for Mind Your Language sitcom where She appeared on three seasons of the show. She reunited with Frazer Hines for Happy Birthday, marking the start of her stage career. She starred in a pantomime of Aladdin.

In 1982, Pascal left for the United States for a two-year contract in The Young and The Restless. While in Hollywood, she had the opportunity to work with Gavillan, My Man Adam, and Lightning, the White Stallion. Her performance in Twelfth Night as Olivia garnered some nice reviews for her.

Pascal lived with Richard Johnson for eleven rough years. They parted ways in 1980. As they were both free-spirited, they weren’t keen on getting married and so they did not. Pascal has a son with Nicholas and was born in 1976.

Her next relationship was with Tim Hauser of The Manhattan Transfer. In 1987, she returned to England and became an advocate for the disadvantaged, mostly for children and the elderly.

In December 2010, she was with Ronnie Wood at Claygate Village Christmas Lights to turn on the village lights. Wood sang a solo performance of Silent Night.

In January 2011, she has appeared in a comedy film for the first time in 20 years.

She has an autobiography, Mind Your Language...Please, that will be available soon for publishing.


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